SH Spotlight Do you want to hear two amazing RCA-Victor 78s from 1932? Ted Weems, Isham Jones..

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Steve Hoffman, Oct 9, 2010.

  1. Greg1954

    Greg1954 New Member

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  2. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Mastering Engineer Your Host Thread Starter

    Too bad this guy has such a strong taste for the sweet bands. I'd sure like to hear some more jazzy stuff in clean shape.. Oh, well!
     
  3. Greg1954

    Greg1954 New Member

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  4. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Mastering Engineer Your Host Thread Starter

    Yeah, good one. Probably got it by accident, heh.

    Too bad it needs a different playback curve. Youch!
     
  5. Greg1954

    Greg1954 New Member

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    Yes, it seems like is there is a midrange dip there.
     
  6. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Mastering Engineer Your Host Thread Starter

    I love old records. I have a pretty good collection of 1925-34 stuff but there are countless dance bands, jazz bands, race and personality records of that era I haven't heard in clean sound yet. There was this wacky collector in the 1970s named George Metz who seemed to have every friggin' record ever pressed from the post acoustic-pre swing era. Used to go over to his place in Glendale and spend the night getting a musical education, spinning this type of stuff. I'd stumble into school the next day. My parents thought I was doing some heroin or something, heh. It was really a shellac high. Miss that guy.
     
  7. Greg1954

    Greg1954 New Member

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    I've actually heard of George Metz from somewhere, can't place it at the moment.

    They recorded a lot of records back then. I'll probably never get around to it all, even just cherry picking what I think I like.

    The Library Of Congress National Jukebox has 10,000 sides up on their site just covering (it appears) the first 25 years or so (acoustic era) of the Victor Talking Machine Co. And they recorded much more than that at Victor.
     
  8. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Mastering Engineer Your Host Thread Starter

    George Metz was a local LA musician, played guitar, etc. in blues bands, bluegrass and all different kinds of stuff. He was tight with Canned Heat and the local 78 collection scene back then. I met him through my girlfriend who knew him from her Dad who worked at CBS.

    He was a wild and crazy guy (in the true sense) and never took very good care of himself. I guess he was like 28 at the time, maybe. A lot older than us but pretty cool. Imagine a guy in shorts and long scraggly beard playing frantic guitar along with a rare BLind Blake blues record at 4 am, full blast, wild eyed, with me, my girlfriend and several others egging him on.

    I learned everything about post acoustically recorded music and recordings from him. A ton of info. I met the late Richard Hite at his place and got further education on old music matters.

    A nice guy but George refused to take care of himself and was an uncontrolled diabetic who indulged in naughty substances. He died not long after. Probably under a pile of scroll Victors with a smile on his face.
     
  9. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Mastering Engineer Your Host Thread Starter

    I appreciate your efforts but please, no Nazi era German recorded music. Artie Shaw himself would bitch..
     
  10. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Mastering Engineer Your Host Thread Starter

    An example of an original Scroll Victor and a Victor repressing 8 years later that used an inferior alternate take (both using wrong stylus for the YouTube transfers, but, hey, all I could find at the moment):

    Paul Whiteman/Bix COQUETTE

    1928 release (marked Take I meaning Ist choice):
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2nmS8qG5NI

    1936 re-release (marked Take 3 meaning 3rd choice):
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K68r4yMSTSk

    The missing "second choice" was probably shipped to Europe/England in 1928.

    Conclusion? Even only a few years later, the original master take metal was gone, destroyed, etc.
     
  11. Greg1954

    Greg1954 New Member

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    That's a nice tune, Coquette. I have that scroll.

    I guess it could have used a smaller and/or different shape stylus, it sounds little dull, almost fuzzy, as heard through the 480p rez, anyway.

    Those many Paul Whiteman Victors are still out there in large numbers, it seems. Batwings...scrolls...circle labels. Low hanging fruit.
     
  12. Greg1954

    Greg1954 New Member

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  13. Greg1954

    Greg1954 New Member

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  14. White_Noise

    White_Noise Forum Resident

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    This is amazing. I love it.
     
  15. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Mastering Engineer Your Host Thread Starter

    Great stuff so far!

    Y'all ever hear a Brunswick "Light Ray" recording? They couldn't get the new WE sound system yet so they devised this method, sort of like the sound of film system, MovieTone. Thing is, they had no volume pots so if the band got loud, it just splattered against the "ceiling" of the system, in other words, total overload, like a Van Gelder from the early 1960's or something.

    At any rate, here is KING OLIVER from 1926 recorded by the Brunswick LIGHT RAY system. Imagine the surprise when the engineer first heard these guys play. They were so loud that the red light went on the console and stayed on the entire time. The frantic sound actually adds some drama to the record. The engineer put King Oliver as far in the back as he could without putting him outside the studio, heh.

    When Abe Lyman heard this record for the first time, he changed his band to sound more like Oliver.

    Enjoy .

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-ZfpO9RE6g&feature=related
     
  16. Greg1954

    Greg1954 New Member

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    The 1926 Brunswick linked to back in post # 146 is a Light Ray too. Don't think the label advertises it yet. Light Ray came on the market quietly in late 1925, I guess they switched to WE by 1927 or so, at least in some studios.



    Palatrope was the name was the name of the system.

    There's a number of theories as to why the Light Ray records have the problems they do. Yours seems very plausible. First I've heard of it.

    The Panatrope was Brunswick's all electrical phonograph, introduced in 1926. The very first on the market, I beleive.
     
  17. Greg1954

    Greg1954 New Member

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    Here's a jazzy side with Gus Arnheim and his soon to be flown the coop singer Bing Crosby with One More Time...

    http://www.youtube.com/user/Resurgam1901#p/u/3/k_F_tPZ7kIk

    Another scroll that saw a different take issued for it's later circle label pressing, which IMO, is actually better.
     
  18. Greg1954

    Greg1954 New Member

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    This is supposedly an electrical side from 1924, on Orlando Marsh's Autograph label.

    Marsh was first on the market with electrical records, from a system of his devising, though to listen to this one, it sounds acoustic. The distortion overload sounds electric.

    Up Jumped The Devil by the Merritt Brunies...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XoGkztuyU5A
     
  19. 11 Hundred S12

    A 1936 RCA Program Transcription Sample Record with Alfred Newman and the United Artists Orchestra.

    Pipe Dreams

    Love the little breakdown ... keep it rolling @ 40 seconds in and the end chatter/noise. :D
     
  20. Greg1954

    Greg1954 New Member

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    That should be a Victrolac (vinyl) 33 1/3 rpm pressing.

    Don't know why it's a 'sample disc' from 1936.

    As far as I know, Program Transcriptions for consumer use were dead in the water by 1933 or '34.
     
  21. action pact

    action pact Music Omnivore

    Oh my gawd, that is wonderful. Please, put me in that world!
     
  22. Greg1954

    Greg1954 New Member

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    Good as the music is, that King Oliver disc linked to in post # 167 is an exceedingly bad recording, even for Light Ray. It almost reminds me of one of those early electrics made by Banner or somebody. But that Oliver had a Brunswick and a Vocalion 78 issue. Recorded in 1926.

    Brunswick had acquired Vocalion the year before.
     
  23. wildroot indigo

    wildroot indigo Forum Resident

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