EVERY Billboard #1 hit discussion thread 1958-Present

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by alphanguy, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. Jmac1979

    Jmac1979 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Louisville, KY
    I think 1984 is really "Ground Zero" for the future of pop music. There were always successful female pop stars, you had Olivia Newton-John, Donna Summer, Diana Ross, Barbra Streisand, etc....., but I do think the rise in 1984 of Madonna and Lauper (and the next year Whitney Houston would explode, and then Janet Jackson would break out the year after) amongst others definitely changed the landscape to where women became equals to men as pop hitmakers, and the glass ceiling would shatter when these artists would be having blockbuster albums akin to what their male counterparts would sell (as opposed to when a huge Blondie, Donna Summer or Olivia Newton-John album would sell 2-3 million copies, "Like A Virgin" sold 10 million and Whitney's debut sold 13 million) which would set the stage for the diva domination of the 90s
     
  2. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    Next is "Footloose" by Kenny Loggins, #1 from March 25 - April 14, 1984.

     
  3. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    At this time, one of the bigger acts from the 70's was having his final appearance in the top 20.

     
  4. Soulman58

    Soulman58 Forum Resident

    Quite strange to see Al Green on a Motown compilation, but great CD anyway.
     
  5. pablo fanques

    pablo fanques Somebody's Bad Handwroter

    Location:
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    Wow that’s a crazy piece of trivia. Good sleuthing!
     
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  6. Cabinessence66

    Cabinessence66 Well-Known Member

    Location:
    California
    On "Owner of a Lonely Heart", one thing that got mentioned earlier that I'd like to bring up again is I'm pretty sure it's the first number one hit to contain a direct sample. The "orchestra hit" and drum fills were taken from a song called "Kool is Back" by Funk Inc. Considering the future of chart music in this thread I think that's incredibly important. A lot of electronic music, including hip hop, would soon embrace this new ability to create new music with old recordings. I find it kind of funny that honor falls to Yes, of all bands!
     
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  7. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Yeah this is the period where women finally attained a large degree of chart equality. I'd argue it started with Blondie - a rare woman-fronted group - not only topping the charts with "Heart Of Glass" but also finally breaking a New Wave act big on the US pop charts. Even if it was with a (stomping, glamified) disco song, you had a woman bringing a new genre to mass acceptance. That was different. It's no accident that Madonna largely followed the Debbie Harry visual and attitudinal template, at least early on.

    Not long after that success Blondie hit again with the enormous "Call Me", and that was followed by "Bette Davis Eyes" and then "Physical", the other monster hits of the early '80s, all three by women. So the pump was certainly primed, at least on the singles charts. Then Lauper came along and had a string of hit singles and a behemoth of an album, moving an astounding 16 million copies worldwide - 6 million in the US alone. To put that into perspective, the biggest Donna Summer album I think sold 2 million, and Summer was a superstar in the '70s, certainly one of the biggest if not the biggest female act of the decade along with Streisand and Newton-John.

    (A shoutout here to Christine McVie and Stevie Nicks as well, because Fleetwood Mac would have been nothing without them. Surely Mac's unbelievable success didn't go unnoticed by label brass, but other women still found it difficult to get any footing on the rock side of the business outside of Heart and Pat Benatar.)

    She's So Unusual was followed by Madonna's huge breakthru (10 million in the US, 21 million worldwide), then Whitney (13 million US, 22 million worldwide). Within 5 years women went from being a decidedly lesser presence on the charts - especially the album charts - to being much closer to equals (at least as solo acts). They also really put a dent in the presence of more traditional rock on the singles and album charts.

    Women still hadn't and wouldn't reach parity on the group side of the fence, although rock groups became far less important post-grunge. And a lot of the remaining groups were manufactured pop outfits, which are virtually always all-male, The Spice Girls excepted.

    Still, this period with Cyndi, Madonna and Whitney clearly kicked off the modern era, where solo women came to often dominate the upper reaches of the album charts. Alanis, Taylor Swift, Beyonce, Gaga, Adele, Billie Eilish, Ariana Grande, etc. Last year's top 4 albums in the US were all by women.
     
  8. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Not only a sample, but a breakbeat. Something - the sample as breakbeat - which hip-hop and rap would subsequently adopt. I mentioned it in my review of the song upthread.

    I don't. Trevor Horn was a genius. Check out the first EP from Horn's group Art Of Noise, in particular "Beat Box", which uses the same sample I believe. It had been recorded earlier in '83. Yes benefited from his earlier experimentation.

     
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  9. Hoover Factory

    Hoover Factory Old Dude Who Knows Things

    Location:
    Spokane, WA
    Kenny Loggins enjoyed a career resurgence thanks (in part?) to the movies. For awhile, it seemed like every hit movie featured a Kenny Loggins song. They were all very similar - catchy, up tempo pop rock. I liked them, but never purchased any of them whereas I did own a couple of Loggins & Messina albums.

    A side note - “Footloose” is one of my Mom’s favorite movies. I have no idea why - my Mom was in her 50s when it was released, so it’s not a nostalgia thing. She just likes it.
     
  10. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    It's amazing to me how well Loggins adapted to the '80s. You'd have thought he'd have drifted off with the Yacht Rockers, since he ultimately came out of that whole Sweetheart of the Rodeo school of country rock that brought us Linda Ronstadt and the Eagles. He certainly found a way to tweak that to make it fit seamlessly into the '80s. And Hollywood absoultely loved this guy. First Caddyshack and now Footloose. And he wasn't even done with big movie singles yet (although his non-soundtrack work largely stiffed from here on out).
     
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  11. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    He was pretty hot when he was younger, but man, the coke was already taking quite a toll wasn't it? This was a great cut though and a pretty huge hit. As with Donna Summer and "She Works Hard For The Money", it seemed like KC might be staging a comeback. And then that was it.
     
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  12. Grant

    Grant Senior Member

    Location:
    United States
    I bought mine in 1985.
     
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  13. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    The open on the 45 of "Footloose" was a bit different . . .

    We are now in a time where what mix you hear on a song was totally up in the air, and contingent on which radio station you were tuned in to (some had either the LP or 45 version, not both).
     
  14. Grant

    Grant Senior Member

    Location:
    United States
    I was watching MTV constantly in early 1984. They played "So Bad" like crazy. Radio played "Keep Undercover" and "The Man".
     
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  15. Grant

    Grant Senior Member

    Location:
    United States
    I'm one of the few people who don't much care for "Give It Up". I know the song was their introduction to K.C. and have no knowledge of their huge 70s hits.
     
  16. boyjohn

    boyjohn Forum Resident

    Oh god this is terrible (and there is worse to come), before it finallly gets better, but that will take some TIME
     
  17. Grant

    Grant Senior Member

    Location:
    United States
    I had both the 45 and the Footloose album so I had both. But, it frustrated me for decades because you just couldn't get the single mix, which is just a different intro.
     
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  18. Grant

    Grant Senior Member

    Location:
    United States

    I like the song. The film, not so much.

    It was weird when I finally went to see the film at a local theater. Four years had passed between when I graduated from high school and had been a night creature working graveyards and going to college. When my head rose above water and was finally among a youthful crowd, the difference of four years really hit me hard. Suddenly I was around a bunch of teenagers girls wearing bright pastel colors and really big hair, and clean-cut guys with skinny ties, like I had walked into the Valley Girl movie. Yikes! I was gettin' OLD! My mindset was still in the 70s as far as fashion was concerned. It wasn't even that bad when I was out in L.A. just two years before! Well, I did own a pair of parachute pants that I bought in an Orange County mall, but that's another story...
     
  19. Hey Vinyl Man

    Hey Vinyl Man Another bloody Yank down under...

    Didn't see the movie until about 20 years later (when my then-girlfriend was amazed I hadn't seen it and set about to change that), but I always liked the song. Since I'm not big on '80s top 40 in general, at this point I'm used to my favorites being other people's least-favorites of the era. Looks like this is another of those.
     
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  20. Jrr

    Jrr Forum Resident

    I can’t tell you how excited I was every time a new batch of those Have a Nice Day cd’s came out. If memory serves, they came out in threes. I would slowly read the track lists, not wanting the list to end! I got into cd’s from day one, when there were only 12 Warner’s titles and a few CBS available, but the real fun started when Rhino started kicking out those great, high quality compilations. I also bought the Nice Decade set, with the shag carpet on the front. Though I mainly spin vinyl, I still play all those Rhino discs on occasion, and those inspired me to have a One Hit Wonders section in my vinyl collection. It’s funny how awful most of those one hit artists albums in the 70’s were. Edward Bear (Last Song), Albert Hammond (Never Rains In CA), Bo Donaldson (Billy/Hero) but some like Jigsaw (Sky High) and Pilot (Magic) were fun surprises.
     
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  21. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    We didn't even have cable yet in our neighborhood, believe it or not. Phoenix is vast, like 30 miles across or whatever, so it took ages for cable to reach everywhere. I don't think it hit our neighborhood until maybe '85, if then. The trench they dug in our front yard did perk up the lawn in the patch that had burned a few years before, though. I guess they dug up some richer soil. :laugh: (Or maybe they just broke up the clay soil - it tended to form a hard layer near the surface - allowing water to penetrate faster and deeper. )

    I'd only see MTV while visiting friends in distant neighborhoods who had cable. Or if I was at a mall or something that was wired already (or had satellite).
     
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  22. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    My big fashion wake up call in the '80s came I think in the summer of '84. I started going a lot farther on the bus than I ever had before, all the way over to visit friends in Scottsdale and up to Paradise Valley Mall. It was on one of those excursions to Scottsdale that I stopped by the immense, sprawling Scottsdale Fascist Square mall for the first time in many years - I think we'd been there once before when I was a kid - and took in a very different scene from West Phoenix. Literally every teenage girl was a Madonna clone - bracelets, tousled hair, a crucifix or ten, the works. This was based just off her look mostly in the "Burning Up" video, and I guess "Borderline" to some degree. I'd completely dismissed her up until this point. Being surrounded by Madonna clones in the wealthiest zip code in Arizona woke me up to the fact she was a much, much bigger deal than I'd realized.

    But within a few months, you wouldn't need to visit a mall in Scottsdale to know that Madonna was a very, very big deal.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2020
  23. Jrr

    Jrr Forum Resident

    Well, his solo albums were just abysmal so he deserved it, which was a real bummer for me as I really enjoyed every one of the KC/Sunshine albums. Give It Up was a great song to go out on though. I didn’t know he had a big drug problem. Glad he got through it.
     
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  24. Grant

    Grant Senior Member

    Location:
    United States
    It really upset me when I read an interview by Gary Stewart or Richard Foos, one of those guys, where they said they scraped the bottom of the barrel and weren't going to release more than 25 volumes. I knew he was wrong. At the time he said that, there were still scads of 70s hits that hadn't been digitized at that point, at least not domestically. Well, we have Eric Records to take care of that nowadays, but this is after the labels virtually stopped licensing things and gripping everything with an iron fist, or raising their rates so high that it's not cost-effective for any indie label to do a comp anymore.

    I also bought the entire Soul Hits of the 70s series as well as the Phat Traxs, Pop Hits of the 80s, New Wave Hits Of The 80s, History Of Funk, History of Rap, Big ol' Box Of Soul, Poptopia, the Billboard series, and several other sets I can't even think of. The 90s were a wonderful time to collect high quality CD comps. I miss those days. I would sometimes blow a couple hundred dollars just buying CDs.
     
  25. Grant

    Grant Senior Member

    Location:
    United States
    To this day i've never seen Top Gun and younger people wonder what's wrong with me. I've also never seen Star Wars. Their eyes just pop in disbelief over when I admit that.
     
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