History of CBS Records 30th Street Studio NYC (many pictures)

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by DMortensen, Oct 21, 2014.

  1. DMortensen

    DMortensen Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Seattle, WA USA
    In still more news, while I was in the neighborhood of the studio I went to the former Sheik Restaurant, which we agreed was at 132 Lexington, right?

    The workers there had no knowledge of anything before them being in the same storefront, except that there had been a tile store there and there was still fancy tile in the floor.

    It is indeed an Indian (Asia) supply store, and is an explosion of color and cool stuff inside. Here are some pictures:

    View from front of store to back:

    [​IMG]

    Exotic floor tile:

    [​IMG]

    View through the front of the store that was in "On The Record" with Glenn Gould, Howard Scott, and Don Hunstein.

    [​IMG]

    Hard to believe that narrow little place was a coffee shop.

    The outside front of the store was too dark to get decent shots.

    I did fill them in a little on who was there and what movie it was in, but I'm not sure they knew who Glenn Gould was...

    And hey, this is page 100!
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2019
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  2. GLouie

    GLouie Forum Resident

    Location:
    Seattle
    I think id’ve preferred a continuous video, sped up to fit the time!
     
  3. DMortensen

    DMortensen Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Seattle, WA USA
    I don't have the right kind of camera with me. I don't believe mine would keep shooting movies that long. Plus, I didn't plan it at all, just decided while there.
     
  4. doug pomeroy

    doug pomeroy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY, USA
    I remember seeing that mic in the mic cabinet at 30th Street. I'd never seen one before. And I never saw it being u8sed at 30th Street.
     
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  5. doug pomeroy

    doug pomeroy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY, USA
    The mixing cubicles on the 6th floor of the building on 57th Street had KLH Sixes, mainly for the classical producers, who recognized the KLH's had a flatter frequency response than the huge Altec A7's. We put the KLH's on top of the Altec's.
     
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  6. doug pomeroy

    doug pomeroy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY, USA
    I don't know about 1957, but when I started at Columbia in 1969, he control men chose the mics, plugged them in and positioned them.
     
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  7. doug pomeroy

    doug pomeroy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY, USA
    To the west of the machine room (which was basically part of the control room), there was a rest room and shower, which I was told Goddard had built so he could shower after a day in the studio.
     
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  8. doug pomeroy

    doug pomeroy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY, USA
    CORRECTION, I meant EAST, not WEST.
     
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  9. doug pomeroy

    doug pomeroy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY, USA
    You got the position of Studio D correct. Maybe "Bruno Walter" was a name used for the bathroom and shower which Goddard had built for Bruno Walter?
     
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  10. lukpac

    lukpac Senior Member

    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    That refers to the poster of Walter that was hanging in the machine room:

    [​IMG]
     
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  11. doug pomeroy

    doug pomeroy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY, USA
    I don't remember any window to the left of the table. What I remember is that there was no table where one is shown in the photo. That was where the mixing console was, and to go into the studio, one would walk to the right (not shown in the photo), and exit from a door which lead to the narrow hallway. The door to the D studio was from that narrow hallway also, so to go from the control room to the (very small) studio you had to go through two doors. And the large patchbay was behind the console, and the photo doesn't not show any such thing.
    Finally, the entrance to control room D was from a door at the left of the room, not the right, as shown in the photo. So, I would conclude the photo is not from Studio D!
     
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  12. doug pomeroy

    doug pomeroy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY, USA
    You are right of course.
     
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  13. doug pomeroy

    doug pomeroy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY, USA
     
  14. doug pomeroy

    doug pomeroy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY, USA
     
  15. doug pomeroy

    doug pomeroy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY, USA
    Moog synthesizer shown in Studio D, definitely. The John Cage session was for a recording of his music for toy piano. I was running tape machines for that session.
    I've always wondered if Columbia issued it.
     
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  16. lukpac

    lukpac Senior Member

    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    Hopefully these photos work:

    [​IMG]
    John Cage, composer-in-residence at UC in 1967, helps pianist Jeanne Kirstein add bolts, pennies and cardboard to the piano strings in preparation to performing one of his uncaged works.(Photo: The Enquirer/Allan Kain)

    [​IMG]
    John Cage, composer-in-residence at UC, listens to pianist Jeanne Kirstein perform one of his compositions in 1967. (Photo: The Enquirer/Allan Kain)

    Our history: Short stays by the famous made big impact

    "Pianist Jeanne Kirstein, also on the CCM faculty, performed Cage’s works on a “prepared piano,” in which objects such as bolts, pennies, and cardboard were placed between the piano strings, creating “a sort of psychodelic [sic] sound,” The Enquirer wrote."

    The original story is in the July 9, 1967 edition of The Cincinnati Enquirer.
     
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  17. DMortensen

    DMortensen Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Seattle, WA USA
    Hi Doug,

    I heard someone, possibly Steve Epstein because I'm not sure who it would have been if not him or you, say that it was the Horowitz Room because it was built for him so he could relax in between takes. I also heard Frank Laico say that an executive had it built so he could have "meetings" with female people from a variety of professions, or so I understood from the way he said it.

    Was the access to that room from the studio or the hallway/area behind the control room? Or from the hallway on the East side of the building from street door to studio? The building plans that I got the day we chatted behind the WTC (which you were the first one to see) showed a couple of doors in that little hallway but had no indication of what was behind the doors to the West.

    As you know by now, we are always trying to figure out what was never in any pictures, and this is the first new info in quite a while.

    Thanks!
    Dan
     
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