Last B&W widescreen Hollywood movie?

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by chacha, May 16, 2019.

  1. chacha

    chacha Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    mill valley CA USA
    Was watching TCM tonight and a beautiful looking Black & White 2:35 widescreen film was on called The Outrage from 1964. Which really caught my eye and got me thinking that this had to be pretty close to the end of Hollywood B&W widescreen releases. Anyone know which film or films were the last ones from Hollywood?
     
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  2. budwhite

    budwhite Climb the mountains and get their good tidings.

    Location:
    Götaland, Sverige
    In cold blood from 1967 comes to mind.
    And Manhattan from 1979.
     
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  3. razerx

    razerx Who me?

    Location:
    The East
    Wasn’t Stranger Than Paradise shot in b/w? That was in the early 80’s. Need to confirm if it was widescreen.
     
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  4. mBen989

    mBen989 Forum Resident

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    Scranton, PA
    Flat widescreen, not CinemaScope.
     
  5. ries

    ries Forum Resident

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  6. chacha

    chacha Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    mill valley CA USA
    Ah, so maybe In Cold Blood in 67 was pretty much the end of Hollywood widescreen B&W. I forgot about that one. I would think there were very few in 66 if any.
     
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  7. budwhite

    budwhite Climb the mountains and get their good tidings.

    Location:
    Götaland, Sverige
    Yeah, and I think there were very few b&w scope in '65 as well.

    Black and white(in any aspect ratio) had a good 30 year run after the late 30s technicolor wonder hit the screens. Pretty amazing in some ways
     
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  8. Al Kuenster

    Al Kuenster Forum Resident

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    Las Vegas, NV - US
    Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolf? 1966
     
  9. Bink

    Bink Forum Resident

    The Artist (2011)
     
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  10. dirwuf

    dirwuf Raccoon of the Year

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    Fairfield, CT
    Perhaps not the last, but The Fortune Cookie (October, ‘66) was near the end...
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2019
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  11. ries

    ries Forum Resident

  12. Squealy

    Squealy Forum Hall Of Fame

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    I think the question is really about the end of the period where black and white movies were made regularly... not occasional throwback movies from the 70s and onward.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2019
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  13. jbmcb

    jbmcb Forum Resident

    Location:
    Troy, MI, USA
    It was shot in 1.33:1 to keep with the old-school Hollywood feel. The Good German did the same thing.

    Schindler's List was 1.85:1, though I don't think it was actually shot in black & white.
    The Man Who Wasn't There was also shot in 1.85:1.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2019
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  14. chacha

    chacha Forum Resident Thread Starter

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    mill valley CA USA
    That wasn’t widescreen 2:35.
    I think it was around 1:85 as I recall.
     
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  15. chacha

    chacha Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    mill valley CA USA
    Yes correct. Thanks
     
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  16. chacha

    chacha Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    mill valley CA USA
    Yes! Forgot about that one. Saw it in the theater as a kid.
     
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  17. Al Kuenster

    Al Kuenster Forum Resident

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    Las Vegas, NV - US
    The Elephant Man (1981)
    Suture (1994)
     
  18. Vidiot

    Vidiot Now in 4K HDR!

    Location:
    Hollywood, USA
    Suture was the last major film I can think of that was shot in B&W scope on motion picture film.

    Roma was shot in Alexa 65mm digital and changed to B&W in post (by senior finishing artists Steven J. Scott & Charles Bunnag), and I don't believe it was anamorphic scope -- I think they were all spherical Zeiss Supreme Prime lenses. This was the opposite of a typical "soft" anamorphic widescreen movie shot on film, absolutely pin-sharp.
     
  19. Ghostworld

    Ghostworld Forum Resident

    Location:
    US


    i'll take black and white over color, anyday.
     
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  20. Ignatius

    Ignatius Forum Resident

  21. Vidiot

    Vidiot Now in 4K HDR!

    Location:
    Hollywood, USA
    No, Ed Wood was 1.85, not scope. But it was shot in 35mm B&W.
     
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  22. budwhite

    budwhite Climb the mountains and get their good tidings.

    Location:
    Götaland, Sverige
    Have not seen Roma but I think it's pointless to make a b&w movie if you don't shoot it on b&w film
     
  23. chacha

    chacha Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    mill valley CA USA
    I saw it transferred to 70 mm film and it looked great.
     
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  24. team2

    team2 Forum Resident

    Otto Preminger's Bunny Lake Is Missing from 1965 was a later B&W widescreen release. One of my favorites, with excellent cinematography:

     
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  25. Vidiot

    Vidiot Now in 4K HDR!

    Location:
    Hollywood, USA
    Oh, I dunno. The Artist was shot on color film and then changed to B&W during the final digital correction in post, and it was nominated for six Golden Globes (won 3), twelve BAFTA awards (won seven), and nominated for ten Oscars (and won five), and made $133 million at the box office. Not bad for a film that only cost $15 million... and was shot on Kodak 5219 (my favorite existing film stock):

    The Artist’s Cinematographer Speaks - Studio Daily

    [​IMG]

    So much can be done now to digitally manipulate grayscale from color film, it's a whole new ballgame in how things can be changed. The fact that they made this 2011 feature look like a 1927 production shot on nitrate film is even more astonishing. I defy you to look at it and believe it wasn't shot on B&W film.

    Roma was nominated for ten Oscars and won three, and receive massive accolades for its unusual B&W look, and more than a few cinematography awards. I don't think it looks like it was shot on film, but it does have a striking technical style, and I think it works for the story they were trying to tell.
     
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