OLED TV/Monitor Owner Thread ver. Dolby Vision is neat

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by White_Noise, Jun 10, 2017.

  1. Kiko1974

    Kiko1974 Forum Resident

    Thanks for your reply. As I understand it the limitation is on the OLED pixels themselves, therey're so tiny that the amount of light they can emit is limited, isn't it the reason? I don'y know why but there's something about OLEDs that I don't quite like it. I've seen OLEds at shops show rooms but also at a friend's house playing 4K HDR video from a Sony UBP X-800 UHD BD player (the same that I own) and I liked its contrast, who else doesn? But I don't know, maybe it's how it displays color, the amount of light or maybe it's just that I'm used to my Samsung QLED and one's eyes take some time to get used to a new display technology (I didn't miss old CRT's at all, and I didn't changed from SD CRT to HD LCD, my last CRT set was an HD one and I had a second generation Sony BD player player back in 2007).
     
  2. R. Cat Conrad

    R. Cat Conrad While the moderators jest... Well, you know

    Location:
    D/FW Metroplex
    If you're on the fence the best idea might be to wait just a little longer. Deesky & I both mentioned the in-progress variation on LED technology; that may be a real game changer. If MicroLED pans out it might be the best panel display tech on the market. The key is whether the black levels of OLED can be achieved and brightness improved by combining the best aspects of LED and OLED. If that happens we should be approaching the end of the upgrade road for HT panel tech. My biggest issue with OLED has always been the image retention/burn in risk, brightness is important, but a secondary concern. Naturally, gaming drives a lot of the large panel market is these days, but having a display that allows watching classic movies & TV series for hours in their proper aspect ratios (without IR risk) has always been a deal breaker for me.

    :cheers:
    Cat
     
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  3. Vidiot

    Vidiot Now in 4K HDR!

    Location:
    Hollywood, USA
    If it's not set up correctly, then it's hard to make real judgments. It's possible your own set and your friend's OLED set are so far out of alignment in different directions, you're seeing images that are wildly wrong.

    What is true is that there are limitations on how bright OLED images can get, and even on the pro end, they top out at 1000 nits for HDR (ten times the brightness of a "normal" monitor). In order to go beyond that to 4000 nits for Dolby Vision, manufacturers have returned to variations of LCD technology to get brighter images for mastering. There are arguments you can make pro and con different kinds of screen technology, but it's clear that OLED is kind of falling by the wayside. I'm still a big fan of OLED and will most likely get the LG C9 when it gets released in April/May.
     
  4. supermd

    supermd Forum Resident

    Location:
    Campbell, CA
    If OLED is falling by the wayside, what is the emerging tech that is better than (improves upon) OLED? microLED?
     
  5. Deesky

    Deesky Forum Resident

    OLED isn't falling by the wayside, at least not yet, certainly not in the consumer TV space. The next challenger will be microLEDs almost certainly, but yields and costs still need to improve before they can challenge OLEDs for dominance.

    But there are still LCDs in the marketplace with LED backlighting which are much brighter than OLEDs and improvements are still being made to bring them closer to OLEDs in terms of viewing angles, black levels and HDR handling.

    Apple has recently released a reference level color grading LCD monitor for professionals that approaches OLED level quality (in certain areas). The Pro Display XDR is a 32" LCD display with a 6016 x 3384 (6K) native resolution and supports DCI-P3 wide color, true 10-bit, uses a new polarizer that allows the color and contrast to remain true even at extreme viewing angles. It lists at $4999, plus $999 if you want a stand for it! :)

    Yeah, it's not a consumer display, but it shows that LCD based technology can still be extended and might trickle into the consumer space (unless mircoLEDs come onstream).
     
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  6. GregM

    GregM Senior Member

    Location:
    Daddyland, CA
    I just got the new LG (2019) 77" OLED. I'm still trying to wrap my brain around all the upgrades. Any one of the upgrades from a plasma to an OLED, a 60" to a 77", or a 1080p screen to 4K is a significant improvement, but all three at once is just blowing my mind.
     
  7. Maccaroni

    Maccaroni Forum Resident

    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    Look up the model at rtings.com and plug in their suggested settings and it'll blow your mind further.
     
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  8. GregM

    GregM Senior Member

    Location:
    Daddyland, CA
    I think I've got it pretty much dialed in but it couldn't hurt to double check.
     
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  9. Vidiot

    Vidiot Now in 4K HDR!

    Location:
    Hollywood, USA
    It is in the mastering-quality reference monitor business, where TFT screens like Sony's BVM-X310 are the new reference standard:

    [​IMG]

    https://pro.sony/en_GB/products/broadcastpromonitors/bvm-hx310

    Sony told me at NAB in April that they weren't happy with the quality of the yields on OLED screens, so they made the switch to TFT (LED/LCD) because they felt they could get more accurate light outputs for a longer period of time. It's said that the number of OLED panels they used are dwindling, and it'll be hard to get them in another year or two.

    Things are different for mere mortals. OLED at the moment is seen as the "high end" consumer monitor business, where you have to pay more than $1200 for a decent 55" display. The regular LCD sets are down below $600, and will no doubt get even cheaper during special sales (like the upcoming 4th of July weekend). What's a concern to me is that no matter what you pay for a consumer monitor, they still don't come out of the box calibrated, and people won't really know what they're seeing if it's way out of whack.

    BTW, Apple went out of their way to tout their new $6000 "XDR" display a few weeks ago, which they claim rivals true mastering-quality monitors like the Sony BVMs. I'm skeptical they can do it for 1/7th the price, but note that this set is also LCD (albeit very high-quality dual-layer LCD).

    https://www.apple.com/pro-display-xdr/
     
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  10. supermd

    supermd Forum Resident

    Location:
    Campbell, CA
    Interesting. I have a great plasma right now. If I were to buy a new TV in about 2 years, would that TV be an OLED, or would it be something else, if I were to go for the best type out there? How long do you think OLED will be the dominant, "best" consumer television? Should I wait a bit longer for something better?
     
  11. tomhayes

    tomhayes Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Diego, Ca
    In the consumer space I think OLED is the best lookign screen you can buy now - within the use case limits.

    If you need a TV that's on 12 hours a day on screens with non moving graphics it's not the way to go.

    If you a TV it in a room with glass walls and glass ceiling and exposed to direct sunlight, it's not the way to go.

    If you have your TV in a room where you can dim the lights and you watch movies and TV and video games for a few hours at a time then it's the best consumer choice.

    I was all about SED TVs in the mid 2000's , but when those failed to emerge I went LCD. OLED, for me, has been a huge upgrade.

    And the 65" C9 (2019 OELD model) are on sale for as low as $2299 today - when I bought my E7 in 2017 I was LUCKY to pay $2700 for it.
     
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  12. scobb

    scobb Forum Resident

    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    I know you are an expert in this stuff and I’m certainly not! Do you think this could be to do with margins? At the moment Sony have to buy the panels from LG and I assume they cost a pretty sum reducing Sony’s margin when they sell their TV’s. It seems clear to me that Sony have a vested, financial, interest in finding a competitor to OLED TV?

    At the moment I don’t see anything in the retail market that comes close to OLED TV so can’t imagine it will disappear in two years.
     
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  13. supermd

    supermd Forum Resident

    Location:
    Campbell, CA
    That's me! Thanks for the info. :)
     
  14. Deesky

    Deesky Forum Resident

    What Vidiot was talking about isn't a normal 'TV', but a high-end reference, calibrated monitor. In this (professional, non-consumer) space, it's all about the specs and very little to do with margins (these monitors go for tens of thousands of dollars). So things like absolute brightness sustained over long periods of time, while maintaining color accuracy and dynamic range are currently better handled by advanced LCD/LED monitors than consumer grade OLED panels.
     
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  15. GregM

    GregM Senior Member

    Location:
    Daddyland, CA
    Excellent point. And how close to the monitor do the pros sit? I feel like many of us are missing the point about screen size and how far you sit from it, in these discussions.
     
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  16. Maccaroni

    Maccaroni Forum Resident

    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    What are your inputs generally? I went from a Panasonic plasma (50 inch) to LG OLED (65 inch). No regrets. There is not a great deal of difference in overall size (width and length) however a BIG difference in depth and weight.

    This leads a much bigger screen to dominate a room much less (great W.A.F.) as a result. The LG really is very nice from a design perspective. Also good for the WAF is the fact that I now have a single remote, and no boxes (we exclusively use Netflix and Plex for which there are native apps) as well as an LG soundbar.

    The difference was fairly stark for me as well as I was going from 720p to 4k.

    I ask about inputs to determine whether you would actually be in a position to take advantage of features like HDR and the additional resolution.
     
  17. Gary7704

    Gary7704 Jesus saves, Esposito scores on the rebound.

    Location:
    Estero Florida
    I'm looking at the C8 or C9. Can you let us know where you saw the $2299 price for the C9?
     
  18. tomhayes

    tomhayes Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Diego, Ca
    Newegg has it for $2299 right now: https://flash.newegg.com/product/9SIAJKJ95U7775?SID

    People also use the New Egg price to get Best Buy to match it.
     
  19. Gary7704

    Gary7704 Jesus saves, Esposito scores on the rebound.

    Location:
    Estero Florida
  20. Vidiot

    Vidiot Now in 4K HDR!

    Location:
    Hollywood, USA
    Sony actually made their own OLED panels for this $40,000 mastering display, so my guess is that they grew tired of the expense for such a very small market. Also, the new display can get quite a bit brighter than OLED, so OLED does have that limitation: everybody doing more than 1000 nits are using alternate kinds of technology.

    For consumer sets, I think OLEDs are fantastic and I'm a big fan of the LGs. I've owned three of them over the past three years, and I think they're stellar.
     
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  21. I have the premium LG OLED and think its picture quality is fantastic for the price.
     
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  22. supermd

    supermd Forum Resident

    Location:
    Campbell, CA
    Out of curiosity, why have you owned 3 over 3 years? Upgrading every year? Different rooms of the house?
     
  23. Tim Lookingbill

    Tim Lookingbill Alfalfa Male

    Location:
    New Braunfels, TX
    Agreed and even the cheap non-OLED's below $500 LG LED's at Best Buy are pretty reliable for hobbyist photo editing. I bought the one pictured below in 2013 just on the fact it is factory calibrated by a $10k Minolta color analyzer. Calibrated it with my ColorMunki colorimeter and the RGB vcgt 8 bit video LUT neutral bias correction is near perfect. I have the white point calibrated at 100 nits or cd/m2.

    I can also use it as a TV. It has HDMI and VGA connects. Still has excellent viewing angles and decent white balance. No brightness non-uniformity that would affect my photo editing. They also don't seem to drift too much compared to the LCD's I've used in the past.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2019
  24. Vidiot

    Vidiot Now in 4K HDR!

    Location:
    Hollywood, USA
    I use them for a year at work, then move them home when I buy the latest-and-greatest for work. I have a spare at the moment which we need to set up in the living room, but that'll require moving around furniture (and we just moved a couple of months ago).

    I come from a time when a decent consumer TV set used to cost at least $5000-$6000, so picking one up for $1600 is pretty trivial these days.
     
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  25. MikeJedi

    MikeJedi Forum Resident

    Location:
    Las Vegas
    The LG C9 looks like a great value for the money. I wonder if the Sony Master Series OLED is that much better for more $$$. The LG has been getting pretty decent reviews. I have had my Panny Plasma for 7 plus years and these OLEDs are the only ones that beat it. All the rest of the LCD LED QLED are not as good IMO
     
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