One possible reason Star Trek The Motion Picture Directors Cut is not on blu ray?

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by XIDOR, May 21, 2016.

  1. Kiko1974

    Kiko1974 Forum Resident

    The Secam I saw in France looked great for analogue SD. Keep in mind, and you know this better than me, that's not only the system or the quality of the equipment, it's also the skills of the engineers behind the desks. I live in Southern Spain very close to the Maroquian coast, with a rooftop antenna I can receive TV stations from Morocco which looked bad in the old SECAM analogue days and still look bad in the digital days.
     
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  2. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    It looked good in France. I visited for the first time in 1992, just after the elections here, and I marveled at the quality of the cheap little TV in our tiny Latin Quarter hotel room. The colors seemed so much more natural than on American televisions, and the picture far less grainy. The contrast seemed less harsh and more photographic as well.
     
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  3. john morris

    john morris Everybody's Favorite Quadron

    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    Correct me if I am wrong but didn't Japan's HD television system start out as analog and then go to digtial. I heard that analog HD back in the day would have taken up the bandwidth of two NTSC channels.
     
  4. john morris

    john morris Everybody's Favorite Quadron

    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    But my understanding is that the only nations still region locking their DVD/Blu-Ray players is Canada and the States. (That I know of). People in Europe I hear don't have this problem. That all the disk players are region free. Or at least you can easily walk into a store in England and buy a region free player.

    Back in 1993 in Canada if you wanted a VCR to play PAL tapes there were only maybe one or two very expensive models available. The one I saw most frequent was $900. It could convert any tape to play back on any television system in the world. Otherwise no average VCR had even a PAL to NTSC switch.

    That same year I had to go to England to take my sick girlfriend home. I stayed with relatives. They took me to London and what I saw shocked me! Every VCR had a NTSC to PAL switch. It seemed to be a normal thing over there in England but yet wanting to watch PAL tapes was almost a crime over here. Any reason why things were so different?
     
  5. Vidiot

    Vidiot Now in 4K HDR!

    Location:
    Hollywood, USA
    Yes and yes. Even with mild compression, HD takes up roughly six times the bandwidth of SD. Because of the lack of available spectrum space, they had to go to a highly-compressed digital system in order to handle HD broadcasting. 4K is most likely going to be impossible solely over the air: the ATSC 3.0 system uses a combination of over-the-air and internet.

    https://www.atsc.org/newsletter/atsc-3-0-where-we-stand/

    Still no word when and if a Star Trek 4K boxed set will be out -- but I have it on good authority that most of the features have been remastered to 4K.
     
  6. Kiko1974

    Kiko1974 Forum Resident

    Paramount is the studio that seems to release the lower number of catalogue titles on UHD BD and they seemed focused on franchises as Transformers or Mision Impossible, why is that? They sure have recent outstanding movies to be released on UHD BD like The Island, Event Horizon or World War Z.
     
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  7. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Well, given that broadcast stations seem to be dying off, I wouldn't be surprised if they did something to combine channels for the next gen broadcast standard...
     
  8. captainsolo

    captainsolo Forum Resident

    Location:
    Murfreesboro, TN
    I’d still love to see it in person one day but Japanese MUSE was incredible tech and achieved hd via the Laserdisc platform and a decoder.
    Of course like anything it has its problems and limitations but to think they achieved 1080i on disc in the early 90’s....
     
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  9. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    The first HD set I ever saw was at CES in 1986, a rear-projection monster (for the time) from I believe NEC. Presumably an early MUSE-standard unit. I just remember thinking how stunning the color looked. So much more lifelike than any NTSC image, and deeper and richer than most film of the time.
     
  10. Andrew

    Andrew Chairman of the Bored


    :goodie:
     
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  11. john morris

    john morris Everybody's Favorite Quadron

    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    Swoosh!! Over my head. Maybe you could explain what MUSE is. Please!
     
  12. john morris

    john morris Everybody's Favorite Quadron

    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    Wait.. what?!...I thought 4k was already being sent over the air. So to get 4k you need more than a digital attena? You need either Cable T.V., streaming or satellite service? And they talk about one day moving to 8k when they can't even send 4k over the airwaves. Funny!
     
  13. captainsolo

    captainsolo Forum Resident

    Location:
    Murfreesboro, TN
    From wiki:
    "In 1991, several manufacturers announced specifications for what would become known as MUSE LaserDisc, representing a span of almost 15 years until the feats of this HD analog optical disc system would finally be duplicated digitally by HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc. Encoded using NHK's MUSE "Hi-Vision" analogue TV system, MUSE discs would operate like standard LaserDiscs but would contain high-definition 1,125-line (1,035 visible lines) (Sony HDVS) video with a 5:3 aspect ratio. The MUSE players were also capable of playing standard NTSC format discs and are superior in performance to non-MUSE players even with these NTSC discs. The MUSE-capable players had several noteworthy advantages over standard LaserDisc players, including a red laser with a much narrower wavelength than the lasers found in standard players. The red laser was capable of reading through disc defects such as scratches and even mild disc rot that would cause most other players to stop, stutter or drop-out. Crosstalk was not an issue with MUSE discs, and the narrow wavelength of the laser allowed for the virtual elimination of crosstalk with normal discs.
    To view MUSE encoded discs, it was necessary to have a MUSE decoder in addition to a compatible player. There are televisions with MUSE decoding built-in and set top tuners with decoders that can provide the proper MUSE input."

    Essentially they found a way of encoding hi def content of sorts onto an LD and via a separate hardware decoder were able to reproduce HD content on early HDTV screens capable of displaying it. This was extremely niche in Japan and cost thousands back in the day but had they been able to stick with it who knows where it might have gone.
     
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  14. Vidiot

    Vidiot Now in 4K HDR!

    Location:
    Hollywood, USA
    You can get 4K streaming content via Netflix, Amazon, Apple, and Hulu. There's very, very limited 4K content available via satellite (but it's highly compressed). The ASTC 3.0 over-the-air 4K broadcast system will involve part of the signal coming over the air, and part of the signal coming over the internet -- it's kind of a mess. I'm very skeptical about 8K, but there's some validity to shooting in 8K and then releasing in 4K, to give you some "weasel room" in post for reframing and so on.
     
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