Replacing the Shure M97xE Cartridge/Stylus

Discussion in 'Audio Hardware' started by retroboxman, Aug 7, 2018.

  1. Mitsuman

    Mitsuman Forum Resident

    Location:
    Missouri
    This one will work just fine. * PIONEER PL-530 Headshell Black Standard of Turntable <*Fast Shipping>CA2 722698915670 | eBay

    Any headshell with the H-4 bayonet will work, but it's best to stick to one that is a similiar weight as the original in my opinion.
     
    patient_ot likes this.
  2. Mitsuman

    Mitsuman Forum Resident

    Location:
    Missouri
    That's what we've been telling you. ;)
     
  3. patient_ot

    patient_ot Forum Resident

    Location:
    USA
    Yes, but again, depending on high differences between the two cartridges and your turntable, you may have to adjust the tonearm height and/or tonearm lifter.
     
  4. McLover

    McLover Forum Resident

    Location:
    East TN
    Yes, A Shure M 44 or a Shure M 55. Those cartridges accept all Shure M 44 needles (Styli) and all M 55 needles (Styli). All are same family. Avoid the Shure M 44-GX (it is a totally different cartridge). .
     
  5. patient_ot

    patient_ot Forum Resident

    Location:
    USA
    I would not remove the cart from the PNP type headshell for two reasons:

    1) people have reported breaking carts this way - the way the PNP carts are somehow different from the standard version

    2) the 2M mono has a conical stylus, alignment is not nearly as critical as with an elliptical or better profile.
     
  6. patient_ot

    patient_ot Forum Resident

    Location:
    USA
    Depends on what standard you align the cart to. Stevenson alignment, or any proprietary alignment based on Stevenson, has the cart sit straight. With Baerwald or Logfren, you have to angle the cart, even with an S-shaped arm.
     
  7. Mitsuman

    Mitsuman Forum Resident

    Location:
    Missouri
    So I mentioned this before.........how do you adjust the position of the cartridge in the PNP headshell to set proper overhang? How can they make a PNP cartridge, without adjustability of the cartridge, and expect it to have the stylus positioned for the correct overhang given the number of different tonearms out there?
     
  8. patient_ot

    patient_ot Forum Resident

    Location:
    USA
    IIRC there is a very small amount of adjustability with the PNP. I think the PNP is primarily made for turntables that use the Technics/52mm overhang. If I didn't have one of those, I would just go for the regular cartridge and mount it on a headhsell that mated well with my tonearm.
     
  9. Helom

    Helom Forum Resident

    Location:
    U.S.
    Yup, no question about it.
     
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  10. retroboxman

    retroboxman Well-Known Member Thread Starter

    Hmmm, I used the Baerwald printable protractor from vinyl engine to align my cart. I squared it off with the head shell as that's what everything I read said to do. Are you saying it should be on an angle? How is this determined?
     
  11. retroboxman

    retroboxman Well-Known Member Thread Starter

    I may have no choice if the overhang is completely out of whack. Perhaps I should ask a technician to do it for me, although I am not sure what would be different as I have mounted carts before. I guess I will have to see the assembly when it arrives IF I have to take it apart. Judging by the photo, it looks like it's mounted with two screws -- and the wires of course.

    Travis
     
  12. Mitsuman

    Mitsuman Forum Resident

    Location:
    Missouri
    If you aligned the cartridge parallel with the front edge of the headshell, adjusted the overhang, and made sure the azimuth (left to right alignment when viewing the cartridge/headshell straight on) is good, don't fret about anything else.

    Take this with a grain of salt, but on my Japanese S-arm, I get the best performance using Lofgren B alignment, but trust me if you did the three things above, sit back and enjoy your now properly set up cartridge. That said, if/when you upgrade to the Jico SAS, we'll walk you through the finer points of aligning it to get the best possible performance. For now, sit back and enjoy the music!
     
  13. What a company makes is determined by demand and what they feel they can sell. With a premium company like Jico, I can imagine that demand will increase as the supply of original stylii is depleted. I seem to remember that Jico stopped offering the M97xe replacement stylus, or you couldn't get one, then they were available at a reduced price.
    Generic universal headshells are very common. I use genuine Audio Technica headshells, Technics 1200 series headshells and universal headshells interchangeably without a problem. I like to see the connectors gold plated as the ones that connect to the cartridge are exposed to the atmosphere and gold does tarnish so that you will never have to worry about a good connection.
     
  14. retroboxman

    retroboxman Well-Known Member Thread Starter

    Apparently there is some concern that JICO and Shure styli were originating from Mexico and NOT Japan. How can one be certain?
     
  15. retroboxman

    retroboxman Well-Known Member Thread Starter

    Quick question for everyone on this thread. With Shure discontinuing phono products, which styli and carts are you hoping to snatch up? Is there any dealers of stock in the group that would have some new N97XE styli to sell and perhaps the M 44-7 cart and styli. I can search eBay but wanted to see if there's any 'insider' deals to be had through this forum. Where do you typically purchase from?
     
  16. retroboxman

    retroboxman Well-Known Member Thread Starter

    The tone arm lifter screw ultimately adjusts Azimuth, correct? And the goal is to get the tone arm angle even from the head shell to the back counter weight -- most people 'eye ball' this, right or is there an instrument to guide/measure it?
     
  17. retroboxman

    retroboxman Well-Known Member Thread Starter

    I see they are only $19. Very affordable. Have you used one with an M97XE cart? Is the cart designed to interpret conical styluses?
     
  18. action pact

    action pact Forum Resident

    They are part of the same family of body types.
     
  19. retroboxman

    retroboxman Well-Known Member Thread Starter

    Right but is the M97XE cart designed to interpret the information from that stylus despite it 'fitting'?
     
  20. Mitsuman

    Mitsuman Forum Resident

    Location:
    Missouri
    The tone arm lifter screw adjusts VTA. Azimuth is making sure the cartridge/stylus is parallel with the record left and right as viewed head on.
    Azimuth
     
  21. retroboxman

    retroboxman Well-Known Member Thread Starter

    Gotcha. VTA: Vertical Tracking Alignment? The process of ensuring the tone arm is straight as it tracks?
     
  22. Mitsuman

    Mitsuman Forum Resident

    Location:
    Missouri
    Vertical Tracking Angle. Based on the stylus/cantilever design, the angle between the stylus and the record groove. Sometimes referred to as SRA or stylus rake angle. Manufacturers publish their recommended SRA, usually around 22 degrees from the surface of the record. You’re trying to recreate the original angle of the cutting stylus.
     
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  23. retroboxman

    retroboxman Well-Known Member Thread Starter

    Got it - are there tools to measure this or is this something you 'eye ball' and simply make sure the tone arm looks level?
     
  24. Mitsuman

    Mitsuman Forum Resident

    Location:
    Missouri
    Eyeball the headshell/cartridge for level and that should be close enough. As viewed from the side, the stylus itself will be angled forward slightly instead of being perfectly perpendicular to the record surface. This changes slightly anyway, based on how much tracking force you are using, and the thickness of the record you are playing. Don’t obsess over it, just level the headshell and arm so it’s parallel to the record.
     
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  25. I know for a fact that the genuine Shure N97xe stylus comes from Mexico and probably always have. My oldest one is dated 2011. I have no idea about the Jico. It almost doesn't matter where something is made anymore. Many manufacturers of anything have left Japan and the U.S., chased away by high labor costs, but have set up their own factories in Mexico, Korea and China. Many Japanese and Korean cars are now made in the U.S. to side-step tariffs and have non-union factories. That is why Toyota abandoned the Fremont, CA plant years ago. Many decades ago, U.S. car manufacturers set up plants on the Canadian side of Lake Michigan because Canada charged high tariffs on U.S. goods. Even Wurlitzer manufactured jukeboxes in Canada when they were still a U.S. company. I've had my hands on a Wurlitzer 1015 bubbler jukebox from the mid-1940's which was made in Canada.
    In short, today, don't worry un-necessarily about where something is made. It is the brand companies' own factories, off-shore. Many turntables now are made in China, most coming out of the same factory, but manufactured to the name-brands' specifications. The ones that are made in the U.S. look mickey-mouse and yet use components made in China.
     

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