Things you miss from old tv shows that you don’t see anymore?

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by Gill-man, Aug 15, 2018.

  1. MikaelaArsenault

    MikaelaArsenault Forum Resident

    Location:
    New Hampshire
    The movie bumpers:

     
  2. MikaelaArsenault

    MikaelaArsenault Forum Resident

    Location:
    New Hampshire
  3. Lightworker

    Lightworker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Deep Texas
    And you could always tell the (Boomers) from D.C. if they recognized Captain Tug and Ranger Hal...

    [​IMG]

    Wow...just realized why CNN's Brian Stelter gives me the creeps (another reason anyway).

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2021
    unclefred and PonceDeLeroy like this.
  4. Solitaire1

    Solitaire1 Carpenters Fan

    The reason The Huckleberry Hound Show had multiple segments rather than just one story throughout the entire show was to allow the removal of one of the segments if a sponsor objected to it. That way you still had two segments you could use. It also allowed for other characters to be featured in the show (Yogi Bear started as part of The Huckleberry Hour Show)

    This is not as new as it seems. Going back to the Fleischer Brothers Betty Boop cartoons, they would use her cartoons to feature other characters so see if they might work in their own series. The Little King was featured in this way, but the most famous one is Popeye The Sailor. Popeye's first appearance was in a Betty Boop cartoon (Betty barely appears in the short) and he proved popular enough to get his own series.
     
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  5. Benjamin Edge

    Benjamin Edge Forum Resident

    Location:
    Milwaukie, OR, US
    Right. Hanna-Barbera's first TV series, The Ruff and Reddy Show, also contained other material controlled by Columbia Pictures/Screen Gems (which H-B had a distribution deal with), including live-action bits and other cartoons like the Color Rhapsodies and Jolly Frolics. This was why, for The Huckleberry Hound Show and subsequent productions, Messrs. Hanna and Barbera wanted completely original material. In addition, The Ruff and Reddy Show was Hanna-Barbera's only attempt at a "serialized" cartoon series (a la Jay Ward's Crusader Rabbit and Rocky & Bullwinkle).

    Despite the unusual way it was shown on NBC, The Ruff and Reddy Show managed to last for three seasons from 1957 to 1960.

    ~Ben
     
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  6. I just think the world would be a much better place if we had a lot more nose twitching...

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Scowl

    Scowl Forum Resident

    Location:
    Portland, OR
    While watching an episode from the second season of Dallas, I saw someone hand Lucy a can of Pepsi with two pieces of black electrical tape over the Pepsi name. That was good enough back then!
     
  8. Randall DeBouvre

    Randall DeBouvre forum resident

    Location:
    Illinois
    I think tv has become more realistic, but one negative side affect of that is that people are unwilling to suspend disbelief.
     
  9. blivet

    blivet Forum Resident

    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Yes, people no longer seem willing to engage their imagination when watching a film or TV show. They refuse to accept the idea that more than one actor can play a given role, for instance. When Anton Yelchin passed away, people automatically assumed that his character in the Star Trek films (should there be any more) would have to die as well. The idea of casting another actor to play Chekov simply never occurred to anyone.
     
  10. Scooterpiety

    Scooterpiety Current operator of the Freedonia peanut stand

    Location:
    Oregon
    I remember Sunrise Semester listed in the TV Guide of 50 years ago, though I don't think I ever saw even a minute of it. I think I watched Davey and Goliath a few times when they had a ball game pre-empting the cartoons on the networks!
     
  11. Scooterpiety

    Scooterpiety Current operator of the Freedonia peanut stand

    Location:
    Oregon
    Yep, I remember waking up as a little kid very early on Saturday mornings all ready to watch cartoons an hour or two before the stations even signed on!
    I used to watch Gumby on KCOP channel 13 and they used this same test pattern. I would switch on the TV and often saw this along with the steady tone. I recall KNBC channel 4 using the same one!
     
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  12. Scowl

    Scowl Forum Resident

    Location:
    Portland, OR
    Yes, I'm sure no one back in 1979 thought that was a Pepsi can with black tape over it. ;)
     
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  13. Randall DeBouvre

    Randall DeBouvre forum resident

    Location:
    Illinois
    well, they did not spend time fretting over it.
     
  14. Scowl

    Scowl Forum Resident

    Location:
    Portland, OR
    They probably smiled at it just like I did forty years later.
     
  15. Paul Gase

    Paul Gase Everything is cheaper than it looks.

    Location:
    California
    Watching old music performances now on a big screen with cleaned optics, one notices tape over instrument logos too.

    Andy Griffith’s Martin typically has black tape over the Martin logo. Why is that anyhow?
     
  16. Benjamin Edge

    Benjamin Edge Forum Resident

    Location:
    Milwaukie, OR, US
    Because C. F. Martin & Company didn't sponsor his 1960-68 TV series.

    ~Ben
     
  17. Paul Gase

    Paul Gase Everything is cheaper than it looks.

    Location:
    California
    I know that. But it’s inconsequential on a 12” screen. Was there a rule? Did the production company approach Martin asking for a sponsorship?

    I guess I am not sure why it mattered?
     
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  18. Benjamin Edge

    Benjamin Edge Forum Resident

    Location:
    Milwaukie, OR, US
    I too would love to know more all about this stuff.

    ~Ben
     
  19. BrentB

    BrentB Urban Angler

    Location:
    Midwestern US
    Because the suits at Martin could come along after the video is released and say "Hey, we want some money...".
    I have noticed that in the crime investigation shows (Forensic Files, Joe Kenda, ect.) the police cars have the logos taped over on steering wheels and grilles.
     
  20. Paul Gase

    Paul Gase Everything is cheaper than it looks.

    Location:
    California
    This is where I get confused. Product placements in later decades involved the product paying the producers. “Hey, we will give you $ to show Martin on TV.”

    Are you saying it was completely the opposite in the 1960s?
     
  21. Randall DeBouvre

    Randall DeBouvre forum resident

    Location:
    Illinois
    No, I still think they would complain about how lame, unrealistic and cheap it looks and not appreciate the drama of the scene.
     
  22. HGN2001

    HGN2001 Mystery picture member

    It's not about the product itself, but about future sales from possibly competitive products. If Andy Griffith is shown clearly playing a Martin guitar, then that would eliminate Gibson from ever sponsoring the show. If the family on HOME IMPROVEMENT is shown drinking Diet Coke, then why would Pepsi ever consider sponsorship of the show.
     
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  23. Scowl

    Scowl Forum Resident

    Location:
    Portland, OR
    The drama of the scene? This happened in a subplot that could have been an ABC Afterschool Special.
     
  24. Randall DeBouvre

    Randall DeBouvre forum resident

    Location:
    Illinois
    Pax vobiscum, baby!
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2021
  25. BrentB

    BrentB Urban Angler

    Location:
    Midwestern US
    Without some kind of contract, which takes time, lawyers, and money it is easier to exclude name brands from shows. As far as who is paying who it could go either way.
     
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