Dismiss Notice
We are making some updates and reconfigurations to our server. Apologies for any downtime or slow forum loading now or within the next week or so. Thanks!

When streaming blurs the line between having a collection and consuming music

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Gaslight, Dec 18, 2014.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Gaslight

    Gaslight ⎧⚍⎫⚑ Thread Starter

    Location:
    Northeast USA
    A little background: Old dude with a large selection of records and LP's. Fairly technical and I've used streaming services for awhile for sampling, but generally I've preferred a large HDD-based music player to carry around.

    However, recently I've bought into the idea of the cloud, at least where I can match some of my music to 1) reduce the local storage requirement and 2) keep that collection of music somewhere that can be easily shared between a tablet / phone / laptop when I'm out-and-about. And it's been very useful, especially as a T-Mobile customer with their Music Freedom plan.

    But as I've accumulated that large amount of music in the cloud via a matching service, it gives me kind of a weird feeling now. Not that it's digital because I'm used to that, what I mean that it's not really my collection so much as it's a giant playlist from the library of a large music provider. The best analogy I could come up with would be playing my own LP at home versus playing a similar LP from someone else's library at someone else's house.

    As time goes on, I figure that line is going to blur even further as what I own (but stream via a music provider) and what I don't (but have in my playlist) mixes even more. I've already had this issue with digital downloads I own that I thought I actually had on CD, so I guess I'll just have to keep track as best I can.
     
  2. Turnaround

    Turnaround Member your mama warned you about

    Location:
    New York
    So you're an "old dude" who's finally turning into a Millennial and getting with the new economy, where access, and not ownership, will define how we consume things.

    As a longtime music collector, I still have the mentality of wanting to "own" the music I love, and even music I don't love (building up that library!). However, I don't feel that way about movies I love, if I can rent them, or books I love, if I have a library card.
     
    The Trinity and Atmospheric like this.
  3. chris8519

    chris8519 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Hey, I'm a Millennial that has a wall of vinyl in a dedicated listening room. Not because it's "vintage", but because of the physical, tangible, ownership aspect of owning vinyl. Friends my age agree: there's no replacing true ownership.

    But: I buy music that I truly love. Music that matters, and deserves to be owned. There's still a place for streaming. But the concept of ownership is simply being redefined, just like you did with books and movies.
     
    theclogs2002 and jonathan_s like this.
  4. Mr Bass

    Mr Bass Chevelle Ma Belle

    Location:
    Mid Atlantic
    Aren't we over-thinking this?? But I guess the whole cloud metaphor invites us to waft gently upwards. What is the difference between streaming and the old radio? The only difference is that you can customize it. So if you ran your own radio station back in the day you too could have been in the cloud before everyone else.
     
  5. Davido

    Davido Forum Resident

    Location:
    Austin
    Yes, of course, everyone posting here is over thinking this! But it's still an interesting question as the evolution continues... btw I don't think the previous posters here are comparing buying/owning a physical record/CD to radio. You're right that both streaming/radio are in the ether, so to speak. Very different from a personal (tangible?) library of music.
     
    Mr Bass likes this.
  6. Gaslight

    Gaslight ⎧⚍⎫⚑ Thread Starter

    Location:
    Northeast USA
    Pretty significant difference. Pandora is more like radio, streaming is not. The radio station comparison is pretty interesting though - surrounded by music but not necessarily yours (unless you were the station owner).

    Just an observation on my part, btw. It's not like I'm going to stop using streaming services. :)
     
  7. Baba Oh Really

    Baba Oh Really Certified "Forum Favorite"

    Location:
    mid west, USA
    There is no blurry line: streaming isn't collecting. Period.

    And that's okay..
     
  8. Bart

    Bart Forum Resident

    Location:
    Boston
    When I see all of the familiar albums in my iTunes Match account, it still feels like "my collection."

    But not quite as much as when I browse the files on my home music server.
     
    Gaslight likes this.
  9. Myke

    Myke Listening

    You just reminded me of my Amazon Music Library. Reminded me.
    On the other paw, my son works outdoors all day, and relies completely on the Cloud's existence.

    No blurry line here.
     
  10. Gaslight

    Gaslight ⎧⚍⎫⚑ Thread Starter

    Location:
    Northeast USA
    If you stream, and only stream without ownership, then yes no blurry line there. But when you stream music that you also own, for example your entire CD collection that you've matched to Rhapsody or iTunes, then the line blurs a bit imo.

    Right, this is what I was getting at exactly. It's your collection, but maybe not so much as when you're using your media server or maybe playing back your rips on your MP3 player. Just a little different and something I have to get more used to.
     
  11. Peter Pyle

    Peter Pyle Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ontario CAN
    Sounds like you're definitely overthinking, bud. Streaming are low quality rentals - pretty simple to me. I don't do Spotify but I'm sure it's not too different from something like YouTube, and it's clearly not the same as having a CD in your hand. It's like the difference between hamburger and steak. :)
     
    The Trinity likes this.
  12. The Trinity

    The Trinity Do what thou wilt, so mote be it.

    Location:
    Canada
    Not really. Hamburger and steak have value. Downloads and streaming have none. :)
     
    Peter Pyle likes this.
  13. Rfreeman

    Rfreeman Forum Resident

    Location:
    Lawrenceville, NJ
    Odd how when I am rehearsing music with people and we want to check out how the original goes in one part, even if I have it on cd, I am more likely to call it up on youtube, as fidelity isnt the point in that situation and it's a lot faster to type it into google than finding the album or cd, putting it on, and getting to the right track.
     
  14. jay.dee

    jay.dee Forum Resident

    Location:
    Barcelona, Spain
    Your analogy is spot-on. Now imagine that someone moves elsewhere or sells part of his collection or downgrades his hifi equipment or replaces your favourite albums with atrociously compressed versions or starts charging you per single listen...

    Highly unlikely? Let's wait and see. :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2014
  15. john greenwood

    john greenwood Senior Member

    Location:
    NYC
    Depends how you define value. If you mean resale value you are correct. But I value music as music - something that enriches my soul. I'm fortunate to own a significant library of music that does so, but I also appreciate the enrichment I find via streaming.
     
    wolfram likes this.
  16. wolfram

    wolfram Slave to the rhythm

    Location:
    Berlin, Germany
    Then he still would have his own collection. He just wouldn't be able to hear it "at someone else's house".
     
  17. bluemooze

    bluemooze Forum Resident

    Location:
    Frenchtown NJ USA
    OP, tell us how your cloud music sounds?
     
  18. The Trinity

    The Trinity Do what thou wilt, so mote be it.

    Location:
    Canada
    I totally understand, as I get the exact same enrichment from my physical library. I also take comfort in knowing that my vinyl library has appreciated in value, well beyond what I have ever paid for it, and should my situation in life change, I can divest myself of my music and recoup my financial interest in it, and then some. Sadly, all the 1's and 0's in the world have no monetary value once iTunes, or whomever, have been paid, and I find that very disconcerting. Knowing that my money has been invested and not just lost to the Internet, also enriches my soul. I have a decent digital library, but I have put next to no money into it, for the reasons I have noted. At the end of the day, I need to know that I did right by my money, and my love of music. But, we are all different, and I am happy for anyone who receives pleasure from a music library, no matter what form it takes.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2014
  19. maushauss

    maushauss Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ohio, USA
    Interesting thread! I've been thinking about downsizing my collection, but I've resisted streaming services ( I do have a decent sized Amazon account, but I feel the need to have possession of the music) , instead ripping my discs to FLAC on flash drives. So far, I'm happy to be able to take my music with me that way and it sounds fine , but I am not confident that the media will hold up. (also keep it all backed up on HD)
     
  20. bluemooze

    bluemooze Forum Resident

    Location:
    Frenchtown NJ USA
    As the owner of a large and excellent vinyl library, I'd like to respectfully ask if you're sure about this? :)
     
    ARK and Metralla like this.
  21. The Trinity

    The Trinity Do what thou wilt, so mote be it.

    Location:
    Canada
    Absolutely. 40 years of collecting results in some very rare and valuable stuff. I have some discs that are worth in excess of $1000, and I paid very little for them initially.

    But, let's look at this another way, hypothetically speaking: your large and excellent record collection did not appreciate in value, because of its content. It still has monetary value that can be recouped if you sell it, unlike digital downloads. Given the two options, you are still ahead of the game financially, as you bought a "real steak" and not a "virtual steak". :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2014
    bluemooze likes this.
  22. john greenwood

    john greenwood Senior Member

    Location:
    NYC
    Of course, there is a difference between digital downloads (via iTunes, HDTracks etc.) and Spotify. My only investment in Spotify is $10 (roughly the equivalent of 1 album) per month, and I listen to far more than one album per month. So I get good value for my money right away.

    Most (not all) of my digital downloads are hi-res releases of recordings not available in hi-res form on disc. And to be honest, they make up less than 0.5% of my collection.
     
  23. The Trinity

    The Trinity Do what thou wilt, so mote be it.

    Location:
    Canada
    It's all personal choice. If you feel that you can justify the expense, and are not worried about not seeing the money again, that's fine. I am not judging you, but I was explaining why I chose my approach, which encompasses the enjoyment of music and preservation of my investment. People other than you and I are willing to sink thousands of dollars into downloads, for mere convenience, but for me, that is an unthinkable expense for handiness.
     
  24. Gaslight

    Gaslight ⎧⚍⎫⚑ Thread Starter

    Location:
    Northeast USA
    Imo, very good sound quality. Near CD quality in fact and definitely usable while I'm out / in the car etc. If anything else, my phone is probably the bottleneck, but that's not a deal breaker.
     
    bluemooze likes this.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

molar-endocrine