Yamaha AV Receiver set-up

Discussion in 'Audio Hardware' started by Pirri96, Jul 29, 2020.

  1. Pirri96

    Pirri96 New Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    Granada, Spain
    Hi there! First of all, I am a newbie in the field, so please excuse me if my question sounds too obvious or even silly.

    I just connected both an Audio-Technica turntable and Alexa to my Yamaha AV Receiver RX-V359 (I used to use it as a Home Cinema), which has 2 basic Panasonic speakers plugged into it (they came with a Micro Hi-Fi system). I'm kind of lost amid all the "programs" the receiver has to offer (5 Ch. Stereo, 2 Ch. Stereo, Straight effect, Dolby Pro Logic II Music, Dolby Pro Logic, Concert Hall mode, The Roxy Thtr...). I just want to listen to music as "pure" (as the artist intended, I mean) and good as possible. Any recommendations?

    Thank you in advance.
     
    Bingo Bongo likes this.
  2. SMc

    SMc Forum Resident

    Location:
    Austin TX
    Straight mode, 2 Channel Stereo. Consult a manual if you add a subwoofer later. Tone controls might activate processing but use your ears to judge whether they help your enjoyment.
     
  3. Pirri96

    Pirri96 New Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    Granada, Spain
    Thank you, SMc. Is a subwoofer advisable?
     
  4. Strat-Mangler

    Strat-Mangler Personal Survival Daily Record-Breaker

    Location:
    Toronto
    If you find your speakers lacking in oomph, you can use one. But they're not necessary if you have loudspeakers with plenty of bass.
     
  5. Pirri96

    Pirri96 New Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    Granada, Spain
    These are the specs. Do they seem well enough?
    Type 2 way, 2 speaker system;
    Woofer 10 cm cone type / Tweeter 6 cm cone type; Impedance High 6 Ω Low 6 Ω; Input power (IEC) High 40 W (Max) Low 40 W (Max); Sound pressure level 82 dB/W (1.0 m); Crossover frequency 3.5 kHz; Frequency range 50 Hz–30 kHz (–16 dB) 55 Hz–25 kHz (–10 dB); Dimensions (W x H x D) 140 mm x 225 mm x 218 mm; Mass 1.95 kg
     
  6. SMc

    SMc Forum Resident

    Location:
    Austin TX
    In general, yes, but if you’re happy with what you have, don’t worry!

    Panasonic makes a lot of micro systems with different speakers. If you have a cheap set of one way speakers you’ll want to change those before adding a sub but their better speakers might be okay for now.
     
    Pirri96 likes this.
  7. Ctiger2

    Ctiger2 Forum Resident

    Location:
    US
    I was never a fan of the Yammy AV Receivers sound quality. I can still remember going from an RX-350 to an RX-V660 and for the life of me I couldn't figure out what happened my sound. It was my first lesson in more expensive gear doesn't always sound better. The 350 was like $300 and the 660 was like $900 so I was expecting an upgrade in sound quality. No matter what settings I used the 660 sounded thin and brittle, compared to the 350. I lived with the 660 and slowly listened to less and less music until I just altogether stopped for a couple years. I couldn't stand listening to this thing and had no money. Coupled with a pair of Klipsch KG4.2's it was just awful. Around 2002 I purchased a McIntosh MAC1500 receiver and never looked back.
     
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  8. Pirri96

    Pirri96 New Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    Granada, Spain
    Thanks again, SMc. The thing is, I already own a subwoofer (it came with the Yamaha receiver). Is it ok to add the sub even if the speakers are subpar? Will it "take up" the strength of the latter (I mean, great low-frequency but mild quality over that frequency)? Or am I just speaking nonsense? Haha
     
  9. Pirri96

    Pirri96 New Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    Granada, Spain
    Thank you, Ctiger2. Your McIntosh looks superb. However, given my newbie condition in the field of sound hardware, I would hardly appreciate the real difference between my Yamaha and your MAC. Surely, when I get become more skilled, I will consider buying the latter!
     
  10. SMc

    SMc Forum Resident

    Location:
    Austin TX
    Because you have an AVR it’s easier to add a sub. Just go through the setup steps again and set your front speakers to ‘small.’ They’ll sound better not having to reproduce bass. You won’t use the direct setting (the crossover requires DSP) but usually the result is better.
     
  11. Pirri96

    Pirri96 New Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    Granada, Spain
    Appreciate it, SMc, I followed your guidance. I'd have two (last) questions though, if you allow me: 1. I've read that, in most cases, it is advisable to select the "High" input in the back of the sub. Am I right?; 2. My receiver would not let me adjust the crossover (it is somehow fixed by default), but I can modify the LFE level (from -20dB to 0dB). I've left it at 0dB. Is that the right setting? Thank you in advance.
     
  12. SMc

    SMc Forum Resident

    Location:
    Austin TX
    Use the ‘high’ speaker wire connection if you have a passive sub and if you do, use the receiver in stereo mode. If you have a powered sub, use the RCA sub output and setup as usual using the onscreen guide. That way you’ll have the benefit of a crossover. Don’t worry about the LFE setting as your stereo programming doesn’t have an LFE channel.
     
  13. Bingo Bongo

    Bingo Bongo Music gives me Eargasms

    Yes! It's the closest sound you'll get to live music.

    P.S. I have the RX-V365 Natural Sound receiver @ 105/w , it kicks some serious volume a$$. It sounds great in 2 channel mode w/sub, and some music sounds pretty cool in surround sound.
     
  14. I have a similar Yamaha TSR-7850R, did you run the YPAO mic setup? This will adjust levels for where you are sitting, in case one speaker is further, angled, has different sound reflections than the other, and is very critical when you have 5 or 7 speakers plus a sub. Experiment with setting the fronts as small or large. And if small, experiment with the crossover settings. This is assuming you have a sub, if not, set your speakers as large, so they receive full signal. You may like the direct or pure 2 channel sound, but the DSP modes sound pretty good to me as well. Try them. I have a hodgepodge of speakers as this setup is for mixed HT and audio, but if you're dedicated for audio only, you may want to move to an integrated amp and better front speakers. If mixed or HT use, you will want a sub, and some rear speakers, possibly some surround heights later as well.
     
  15. head_unit

    head_unit Forum Resident

    Location:
    Los Angeles CA USA
    Those micro systems can deliver a lot of value for the money, but the speakers and subs are very very very rarely up to the level of "real" speakers and subs. Which exact model was this stuff from?
    - I'd generally agree to get good main speakers first. Exactly what would depend a lot on budget an available space.
    - "Real" subs for movie explosions begin with at least a 12" woofer, 500 watts, and like above $500. Then again, I gave this $99 wonder Monoprice 12in 150-Watt Powered Subwoofer, Black - Monoprice.com to my brother for Christmas and it's a great value. Not gonna break his windows and feel like Motorhead live in his living room, but it really filled in the sound of his in-walls. I told him if he needed more volume to just stack a half dozen. Polk has something vaguely similar.
    - If you add a sub in the future, you *might* need to run the YPAO optimizer to engage a highpass crossover and cut the bass out of the main speakers so they don't overload.
     
  16. Lenny99

    Lenny99 New Member

    Location:
    Clarksburg WV
    Hi:

    I’m also new here. I returned to the HiFi hobby about one and 1/2 years ago. I was pretty much into the hobby back in the 1980’s, but I gave it up for several reasons.

    At any rate, I thought I’d add my 2 cents. I have a much similar receiver, a Sony STRDH190. Concerning the speakers I ultimately purchased: I use two sets. Sony SSCS5, 3way bookshelf speakers, and Polk Audio T15 2way bookshelf speakers. They sound fine and easily fill my rather small listening room 12 ‘ x 14‘ with full sound.

    I have the Sony’s on speaker stands 24” high. This was a very big improvement. By themselves, the Sony’s provide very good, clear sound. Perhaps a little light on the bass end, but otherwise very nice. The Polk’s sit near the bottom of my stereo stand, flanking both sides of my system. They also have a very nice, clear sound, and provide a deeper, warming bass. This maybe due to their location or the design of the bass speaker.

    At any rate, I’m very satisfied, not that I’ll stop trying to improve the sound, but I like what I hear from my system.

    I know I have went on a bit, to get to my point which is that I purchased my entire system piecemeal; not my preferred way, but as my economics permitted. Thus, instead of one pair of $350 to $400 speakers I have two pair that come to approx that amount. The Polk’s were purchased first, the Sony’s about a year later.

    When one is somewhat limited per economics, you must use all your knowledge to purchase the best equipment when you are able. Thus, to use an old saying, one must “go with the flow”. This can be especially challenging, (will you wait and save for what you believe is a better piece of equipment, or jump on what you think is a good deal). If successful, the result is very rewarding.

    I suppose my advice is to settle on a particular pair of speakers that you feel you can comfortably afford. Than save, purchase on credit, etc. Take your time and be as sure as possible since the equipment will be with you a long time.
    At the same time keep a close eye on what maybe a better deal.

    I had a lot of fun searching for the various equipment I believed would provide the sound I felt I would like. Enjoy the ride.

    Good luck,
    Lenny.
     

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